How Macronutrients Work in Your Body

How Macronutrients Work in Your Body

1585
SHARE

Macronutrients

Choose the best sources of protein, carbohydrates, and fats to maximize fat loss and muscle building.

EVERYTHING YOU EAT causes metabolic and physiological responses in your body. Each of the three macronutrients—Protein, Carbohydrate products, and Fat—plays its role in altering the shape and size of your physique. As a bodybuilder, you will become an expert at eliciting the changes you desire, mainly body fat loss and muscle gain, by manipulating your intake of the macronutrients. Understanding the basics of how different macronutrients work will allow you to tweak your diet according to your body’s needs throughout your physique transformation. Let’s take an in-depth look at each macronutrient.

macronutrient-breakdown-body

Protein

Here has always been debate over the protein requirements of bodybuilders. Muscle contains about 40 percent of the protein in the human body, which has led people to believe that eating dietary protein correlates directly to large muscles. Yes, dietary protein is crucial in the rebuilding and recovery process, but in and of itself, protein does not build muscle. This misguided belief is particularly common among bodybuilders, who regularly consume an abundance of protein supplements, amino acids, and dietary protein in an attempt to gain an edge. The truth is that eating protein does not build muscle alone; it is the stimulus of exercise (resistance training) that ultimately starts the muscle-building process. Muscle growth can occur only if muscle protein synthesis exceeds muscle protein breakdown, so there must be a positive muscle protein balance. Strength training improves muscle protein balance, but, in the absence of food, the balance will remain negative, or catabolic.

The 3 Week Diet

healthy-food-tips-macronutrients

There are more reasons protein is important for bodybuilders beyond muscle. Protein also helps in 
the construction and repair of bone, organs, and connective tissues. It helps your muscles contract, and it regulates the balance of water in your tissues and fosters oxygen and energy transportation. Protein produces enzymes that are essential for digestion and it’s found in antibodies that resist disease. The exact protein requirements for bodybuilders can be debated for days on end, with some bodybuilders saying their protein requirements are no higher than those of the general population and others believing that they must eat beef every day in order to grow muscle.

Complete Protein Sources:
TUNA
SALMON
COTTAGE CHEESE
EGGS—MORE PROTEIN IN THE WHITES
CHICKEN BREAST—BONELESS AND SKINLESS
TURKEY BREAST—BONELESS AND SKINLESS
LEAN BEEF —FLANK STEAK, BISON, SIRLOIN, LEAN GROUND BEEF
LOW-FAT PORK
MILK PROTEIN ISOLATE
WHEY PROTEIN
SOY PROTEIN

macronutrient-in-foods

Keep your diet full of many of these complete protein sources to improve muscle repair following intense strength training sessions throughout the dieting process. An incomplete protein source is a protein that lacks or is too low in one or more of the essential amino acids. Incomplete proteins are also called partial proteins. Some examples include:
GRAINS, SEEDS, NUTS, BEANS, CORN, PEAS

You can turn incomplete proteins into complete proteins by combining them in your meals. These complementary protein sources are two or more incomplete proteins that when combined provide adequate amounts of all nine essential amino acids. A meal of rice and beans, for example, provides adequate amounts of essential amino acids because each contains certain amino acids that the other lacks enough of.

NO COMMENTS

LEAVE A REPLY